White House Fire Station 2

White House, TN
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Square Footage

12,197 SF

Project Description

Stewart-Cooper-Newell Architects teamed with Kline Swinney Associates of Nashville to design a new fire station for White House, TN. The station’s main floor has a gross SF of 10,800, with an 1190 SF mezzanine. The station provides private, co-ed sleeping spaces for firefighters, along with a training room that seats approximately 50 occupants. This space is also available for public meetings and can be closed off from the remainder of the station as needed.

The station incorporates several sustainable design features. The roof and site water runoff are channeled to the Pump Test Pit, which holds water to be used when testing the fire truck pumping apparatus. A geothermal HVAC system and a white roof were included for reducing energy consumption.

Based on a steel structure, the exterior facade is composed of masonry-on-metal studs at the occupied portion of the building and masonry-on-masonry at the truck bays. The station’s floors are stained concrete with epoxy at the truck bays, and the ceilings are primarily acoustic lay-in.

Our Involvement

Programming and Schematic Design Public Safety Consulting Architect
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Square Footage

12,197 SF

Project Description

Stewart-Cooper-Newell Architects teamed with Kline Swinney Associates of Nashville to design a new fire station for White House, TN. The station’s main floor has a gross SF of 10,800, with an 1190 SF mezzanine. The station provides private, co-ed sleeping spaces for firefighters, along with a training room that seats approximately 50 occupants. This space is also available for public meetings and can be closed off from the remainder of the station as needed.

The station incorporates several sustainable design features. The roof and site water runoff are channeled to the Pump Test Pit, which holds water to be used when testing the fire truck pumping apparatus. A geothermal HVAC system and a white roof were included for reducing energy consumption.

Based on a steel structure, the exterior facade is composed of masonry-on-metal studs at the occupied portion of the building and masonry-on-masonry at the truck bays. The station’s floors are stained concrete with epoxy at the truck bays, and the ceilings are primarily acoustic lay-in.

Our Involvement

Programming and Schematic Design Public Safety Consulting Architect