Raleigh Fire 6 Station

Raleigh, NC
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Square Footage

14,831 SF

Project Description

Station 6 is Raleigh’s oldest, active fire station.  Built in 1949, it is nestled in the heart of one of this traditional southern city’s most prominent historic districts.  Its relatively small 5,400 square feet severely limits modern apparatus and personnel accommodations.

While the neighbors have little affinity to the “industrial aesthetics” of the old structure, numerous community design charrettes have proven that they take great pride and even ownership in the presence of the fire department in their community.  The neighbors want a new station that reflects the historic nature of the community, while the RFD wants to preserve some of the elements found in this nearly 70 year-old station.  Before the City razes the old building, numerous items will be salvaged to reuse in the new station.  This includes some original brick and hardwood floors, the fire pole, and even some original, decorative door hardware.

The small site creates many challenges, including fifteen feet of grade change, very old specimen hardwood trees that will be preserved, and a shared property line with a prominent, historic residence.

Designing a station nearly three times larger than its predecessor requires much articulation of the facades – in order to not over-power the adjacent neighbors.  The building forms, materials, masonry details and other characteristics were selected to compliment the historic neighborhood.  Once completed, Station 6 will add a new tiller ladder company to the engine company already housed.  Station 6 will target LEED Silver.

Our Involvement

Architect of Record
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Square Footage

14,831 SF

Project Description

Station 6 is Raleigh’s oldest, active fire station.  Built in 1949, it is nestled in the heart of one of this traditional southern city’s most prominent historic districts.  Its relatively small 5,400 square feet severely limits modern apparatus and personnel accommodations.

While the neighbors have little affinity to the “industrial aesthetics” of the old structure, numerous community design charrettes have proven that they take great pride and even ownership in the presence of the fire department in their community.  The neighbors want a new station that reflects the historic nature of the community, while the RFD wants to preserve some of the elements found in this nearly 70 year-old station.  Before the City razes the old building, numerous items will be salvaged to reuse in the new station.  This includes some original brick and hardwood floors, the fire pole, and even some original, decorative door hardware.

The small site creates many challenges, including fifteen feet of grade change, very old specimen hardwood trees that will be preserved, and a shared property line with a prominent, historic residence.

Designing a station nearly three times larger than its predecessor requires much articulation of the facades – in order to not over-power the adjacent neighbors.  The building forms, materials, masonry details and other characteristics were selected to compliment the historic neighborhood.  Once completed, Station 6 will add a new tiller ladder company to the engine company already housed.  Station 6 will target LEED Silver.

Our Involvement

Architect of Record