Danville Fire

Danville, VA
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Square Footage

26,000 SF (Fire HQ, Fire Station and EOC) 4,800 SF (Emergency Management + 911)

Project Description

The fire station headquarters rich in symbolism and displays; illustrates how the integration of memorials, museums and historical content within a fire station can foster relationships, tell the story of a department and community, and honor the fire-fighting profession – all while being cost effective.

The project site contained one and a half city blocks of crumbling buildings and contained two exposed stream channels. Cobblestones, hidden below the asphalt, were used as hardscaping material for exterior sidewalks and the interior floor of a glass box museum. The glass box museum protrudes from the front face and provides enhanced views for passing vehicles or pedestrians.

Stream channels were left exposed to compliment the lawn and greenspaces enjoyed by current fire-fighters on the rear patio. Reclaimed timber framing was used to create the grid ceiling in the museum and main central corridors of the station while reclaimed brick were used as the base for the curving front reception desk.

The exterior aesthetic features reflect design elements and principals found in the surrounding buildings; while the interior of the station contains all the spaces and features of a state of the art fire station.

SCNA designed two buildings for the site: the second an EOC; and an Emergency Management location with space for 911 operations and network / I.T. hub space.

The project has been a catalyst for other redevelopment projects in the District.

Our Involvement

Architect of Record
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Square Footage

26,000 SF (Fire HQ, Fire Station and EOC) 4,800 SF (Emergency Management + 911)

Project Description

The fire station headquarters rich in symbolism and displays; illustrates how the integration of memorials, museums and historical content within a fire station can foster relationships, tell the story of a department and community, and honor the fire-fighting profession – all while being cost effective.

The project site contained one and a half city blocks of crumbling buildings and contained two exposed stream channels. Cobblestones, hidden below the asphalt, were used as hardscaping material for exterior sidewalks and the interior floor of a glass box museum. The glass box museum protrudes from the front face and provides enhanced views for passing vehicles or pedestrians.

Stream channels were left exposed to compliment the lawn and greenspaces enjoyed by current fire-fighters on the rear patio. Reclaimed timber framing was used to create the grid ceiling in the museum and main central corridors of the station while reclaimed brick were used as the base for the curving front reception desk.

The exterior aesthetic features reflect design elements and principals found in the surrounding buildings; while the interior of the station contains all the spaces and features of a state of the art fire station.

SCNA designed two buildings for the site: the second an EOC; and an Emergency Management location with space for 911 operations and network / I.T. hub space.

The project has been a catalyst for other redevelopment projects in the District.

Our Involvement

Architect of Record